2016 Mitsubishi Outlander 2.4L AWD Review – Good, But Not Good Enough



Like the Mirage, the 2016 Mitsubishi Outlander 2.4L AWD has been updated for 2016, and while it promises value with seven seats for a relatively low price, it neither impresses nor excites. It seems like the relatively low starting price is the only deal maker for the Outlander as it is “out-everything” by the competition in almost every respect.

2016 Mitsubishi Outlander 2.4L AWD Review - Good, But Not Good Enough

The 2016 Mitsubishi Outlander 2.4L AWD Falls Short

Other than a newly bedazzled snout, the 2016 Mitsubishi Outlander 2.4L AWD is pretty much the same as the 2015 version with a crossover interior and exterior dimensions similar to that of the Honda CR-V or Toyota RAV4, the Outlander can be a versatile vehicle without being too big to park and drive in tight spaces as opposed to larger mid-sized SUVs. Under the hood for this trim is the 2.4-Liter SOHC four cylinder with 166hp paired to a CVT.

The interior refresh of the 2016 Outlander 2.4L AWD makes it a slightly more pleasant place to pass the miles. The Outlander’s three rows of seats stand out in the compact class, and they may seemingly make it a wieldier alternative to larger crossovers. Yet the cabin is narrow, headroom is limited, and Mitsubishi’s rearmost chairs are only slightly more accommodating than the rear jump seats in a sports coupe. The Outlander’s 60/40 split-folding second row is easy to flip and fold, resulting in a big, flat load floor with additional storage underneath, yet it lacks a “recline” feature, and the bottom cushions are too short for lankier occupants. What’s more, there are no HVAC vents in the rear of the center console or any power outlets of any kind behind the front seats.

Powered with a 166-hp 2.4-liter four-cylinder paired with a continuously variable automatic transmission managing the 2016 Mitsubishi Outlander 2.4L AWD’s small corral of ponies as well as its modest 162 lb-ft of torque. The power train just has the right amount of power, the fun-sucking CVT just ruins the whole experience with its notable rubber-band effect that causes revs to rise and fall out of sync with the vehicle’s forward motion making the engine drone annoyingly. Despite the tidy weight of 3668lb, the 166hp of power can only do so much that you’re left with a car that’s more suited to be driven at a relaxed manner, and the car is indeed relaxed no matter how much you floor it, it’s slow as hell. It’s a shame because it has the same AWD system found in the venerable Lancer EVO X but can’t put it to good used as the vehicle can’t even get up to speed properly.


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2016 Mitsubishi Outlander 2.4L AWD Review – Good, But Not Good Enough
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