2017 Nissan GTR Review – A Grand Entrance for the Next Generation



Nissan has reshaped the 2017 Nissan GTR to look sleeker and more modern while adding some refinement both in looks and surprisingly, changed the way it handles. Released in 2007, the original Nissan GTR is already reaching its 10 year life cycle and Nissan thought it’s time for a new generation. While the Nissan calls it the seventh Generation GTR, the basic design of Godzilla remains the same making the “next generation” a sort of face-lift to the original GTR.

2017 Nissan GTR Review - A Grand Entrance for the Next Generation

The 2017 Nissan GTR Might Have Lost its Lust for Mayhem

At a glance you can notice the subtle changes Nissan has done to the exterior of the 2017 Nissan GTR. Updates include a new grille that delivers additional cooling air to the engine, a hood that’s 30 percent stiffer to avoid deflecting at high speed, and a more effective chin spoiler. Horizontal sill plates and a delicately re-contoured C-pillar diminish turbulence down the sides and over the back of the body. A vertical corner fence borrowed from the previous NISMO GT-R and a more effective rear diffuser also improve aerodynamic performance. Under the hood is the same VR38DETT twin turbocharged V6 but with a higher boost pressure bumping the power up to 565hp and paired to an improved lightning quick and silky smooth dual-clutch 6-speed auto.

Inside the 2017 GTR, shift paddles move from the column to the steering wheel, the seatbacks now wrap the driver’s torso, and there’s a new 8.0-inch touchscreen with triple control redundancy. Even so, the switch count is reduced from 27 to 11 despite the addition of a few new functions. Attributes that won the hearts and twisted the minds of the PlayStation generation continue—an instrument cluster that adjusts vertically with the steering column, a center-stack gauge array that reports every pertinent piece of operating data save your heart rate, and a dual-clutch automatic transmission that never misses a shift or a rev match.

Driving the 2017 Nissan GTR, this is where refinement sets in; The GT-R no longer beats you mercilessly on a long, hard drive. The soundtrack is pure engine music—more growl, less howl—thanks to Bose noise cancellation and enhancement technology. Adjustable dampers and drive modes give the GTR it’s three modes namely normal, comfort, and R. Normal is your typical Godzilla behaviour, Comfort tones down everything giving you a more refined ride that’s not available in the original, and R is where Godzilla gets multiple shots of espresso and is now doing hotlaps around the Nurburgring.


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2017 Nissan GTR Review – A Grand Entrance for the Next Generation
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